Dionne, Mrs.


Welcome to Math Intervention! 

 

 

Please make sure to practice math facts with your child.

 

Ideas for practice at home:

Practice facts while in the car.

Play games using playing cards, dominos, and dice.

Counting- by different numbers, and starting at different numbers. Ex: count by 2’s starting with 24.

 

Websites to check out:

Mixing Math 

Everydaymath.com

Multiplication.com – also has addition/subtraction games on the site

Cool Math GamesCoolmathgames.com

http://www.meridian.wednet.edu/drupal/node/285

Math games

Link to many math games

More math games

Homelinks

 

Ipad Apps

·         NumberBonds- Thinkout- has a rocket

·         Numberbonds- SDE purple/orange

·         Math Evolve

·         Number maze

·         My Math ap

·         Multiplication

·         Maths Toolbox

·         Brain Nook math

·         Arithmetic

·         Dino Teaches Math

·         Math Zombies

·         Invaders

·         Multiply Bingo

·         Rekenen

·         Math Party

·         Fraction Circles

·         Math Facts

·         Top It Addition

·         McGraw-Hill Fractions

·         McGraw-Hill multiplication

·         Math Museum

·         Tap and Count 100

·         Meteor Math

·         Pick a Path

·         TT Clock

·         Geoboard

 

List of Commercial Math Games and the Skills They Enforce

 

  • Dominos( visual clustering, pattern recognition, number facts)
  • Number War Games ( visual clustering, arithmetic facts, mathematical concepts)
  • Card Games visual clustering, [pattern recognition, number facts)
  • Chinese Checkers(patterns, spatial orientation. Space organization)
  • Parcheesi (sequencing. Patterns, number relationships
  • Checkers (sequencing. Patterns, spatial orientation/ space organization)
  • Othello ( pattern recognition. Spatial orientation. Visual clustering,. Focus on more than on aspect, variable or concept at a time)
  • Connect Four  (pattern recognition, spatial orientation. Visual clustering, geometrical patterns)
  • Qubic (pattern recognition, spatial orientation, visualization, geometrical patterns)
  • Simon(Sequencing, following multi-step directions, visual and auditory memory)
  •  Battleships(spatial orientation, visualization, visual memory)
  • Cribbage(number relationships, patterns, visual clusters)
  • Quarto(spatial orientation/ space organization, patterns, classification)
  • Krypto (number sense, basic arithmetic facts)
  • Go Muko (pattern recognition, spatial organization)
  • Mankalah (sequencing, counting, estimation, visual clustering)
  • Four Sight (spatial orientation, pattern recognition, logical deduction)
  • Black-Box (logical deduction)
  • Reckon ( number facts, estimation, basic operations)
  • Hex (pattern recognition)
  • Stratego spatial orientation, logical deduction, graphing)
  • Number Safari  (number facts)

 

The following pages describe variations of the game of war using playing cards. Playing cards can be used to teach numbers and number relationships. The games can be played using ordinary playing cards or dominos. It is better to play the games with cards that do not have written numbers on the corners (they can be cut off with scissors). Children have played a variation of some of these games at school and know them by the name “top it.”

The Number War Games

Top It

Ordinary cards have clusters of objects displayed in the center of the card. For example, there are five diamonds displayed in the middle in a particular way.

 

 

 

 

An arrangement of this type is called a visual cluster. The particular arrangements above are the visual cluster of the number five. These clusters help children to form an image of five in their minds. Playing cards are organized according to these clusters. This helps players to recognize the size of collections up to ten without counting.

 

With practice a child will be able to create a picture of the card in their mind. When the card is displayed, the child will be able to recognize it immediately without counting the number of shapes on the card. If they are unable to recognize the numbers this will let you know they will have a difficult time adding and subtracting numbers. They will keep counting on fingers to find the sums and differences of two small numbers. There will be a great difficulty for them to be able to automatize these facts. The following games not only help children to conceptualize the numbers, but help them to master arithmetic facts.

 

Game One: Visual Clustering and Comparison of Numbers

 

Age Range: 3+

The game can be played between two or three players.

Materials:Playing cards (preferably without numbers imprinted on them) including facts cards. Each card’s value is the number of objects displayed by the visual cluster on the card (0-10). Each face card jack, queen, and king is initially given the value or ten. The ace represents one.

 

How to Play:

1.    The whole deck is divided into two equal piles of cards. (three if you are playing with three people)

2.    Each player gets a pile of cards. Each person keeps the cards face down.

3.    When the game begins. Each person turns a card face up. The bigger card wins.

4.    In order to win the round the person has to correctly identify which card number card they have.

5.    If both players have the same value cards, they declare a war.

6.    Each player puts three cards face down. Then each player displays the fourth card face up. The bigger fourth card is the winner.

7.    The winner collects all cards and places them underneath their pile.

8.    The person with an empty hand loses.

Precaution:

The aim of the game is that the child can recognize the number represented by the card instantly. If the child continues to count you need to help them develop the visual image of the card. For example, show the card for a few seconds, then ask the child the number represented by the card. Then hold the card in your hand, with the display hidden from the child.

 

Ask the child the following questions:

Parent: How many marks are on the card?

Child: 7

Parent: point to the card and show them that the cluster is made up of 3+1+3.

Parent: Do you remember how many marks were in this column? (show the back of the card and touch the place where the first column is on the other side) these types of questions are repeated again and again, until the child sees number 7 as combinations of different numbers by visualizing the cluster in their mind. He could say I see 7 as 3 and 4, or 6 and 1, or 5 and 2.

This should be done with each card until the child has automatized these clusters. The Number War Game reinforces this process.

 

Game Two: Addition War

Age Range- 5+

Materials: Playing cards

 How to Play:

1.    The whole deck is divided into two equal piles of cards. (three if you are playing with three people)

2.    Each player gets a pile of cards. Each person keeps the cards face down.

3.    When the game begins. Each person turns two cards face up each person finds the sum of the two cards. The bigger sum wins.

4.    If both players have the same sum, there is a war. For example, one has the five of hearts and the seven of clubs. And the sum is 12. The other person may have the six of spades and the six of diamonds. They declare war.

5.    Each player puts three cards face down. Then each player displays the next two cards face up. Then finds the sum of these two cards. The person with the highest sum is the winner.

6.    The winner collects all cards and places them underneath their pile.

7.    The person with an empty hand loses.

 

This game is appropriate for children who have not mastered their addition facts. Initially, children can count the objects on the cards. However, fairly soon they can begin to rely on the visual clusters to recognize and find the sums. In one game, children will find more than five hundred sums! Within a few weeks, they can master all the addition facts. This game can also be played with dominos.

 

Game Three: Subtraction War

Age Range: 6+

Materials:Playing cards

How to Play:

1.    The whole deck is divided into two equal piles of cards. (three if you are playing with three people)

2.    Each player gets a pile of cards. Each person keeps the cards face down.

3.    When the game begins. Each person turns two cards face up each person finds the difference of the two cards. The bigger difference wins. For example: one has 3 of hearts, and a king of hearts (10), the difference is 7. The second player has a 7 of diamonds and the 7 of hearts, the difference is 0. The first player wins this round.

4.    If both players have the same difference, there is a war..

5.    Each player puts three cards face down. Then each player displays the fourth and fifth card face up. The bigger difference in the fourth and fifth cards is the winner.

6.    The winner collects all cards and places them underneath their pile.

7.    The person with an empty hand loses.

 

In one game, children will use more than five hundred subtraction facts. Within a few weeks, they can master subtraction facts.

 

Variation 1:  After a while, you might make a change in the rules. Each child displays three cards, discards a card of choice, and finds the difference using the remaining two cards.

Variation 2:  Each child displays three cards, finds the sum of any two cards, and subtracts the value of the third card. The bigger outcome of addition and different wins.

 

Game Four: Multiplication War

Objective: To master multiplication facts

Materials: Playing cards

How to Play:

1.    The whole deck is divided into two equal piles of cards. (three if you are playing with three people)

2.    Each player gets a pile of cards. Each person keeps the cards face down. When the game begins. Each person turns two cards face up each person finds the product of the two cards. The bigger product is the winner.

3.    If both players have the same product, there is a war..

4.    Each player puts three cards face down. Then each player displays the fourth and fifth card face up. The bigger product from the fourth and fifth cards is the winner.

5.    The winner collects all cards and places them underneath their pile.

6.    The person with an empty hand loses.

 

 

 

 Mrs. Dionne - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.